Monthly Archives: May 2018

Do you really need Windows / OS X?

If you are thinking of replacing your computer, it’s a good time to take stock of what you actually use it for.

Most people user their computer for researching, reading news, reading and posting social media, collecting pictures, listening to music, streaming videos, playing games, audio/video/text chat, and reading and writing emails, documents and spreadsheets.

You really don’t need a full-blown Mac or PC to do those things; they can be done using other operating systems like Linux, Android, iOS, or ChromeOS. The beauty of these operating systems is that they tend to be less expensive to buy, and both less expensive and easier to run.

One reason that devices running those operating systems are less expensive to buy is that they are not as demanding on hardware, so they don’t need the latest, fastest, most expensive hardware. Another reason is that those operating systems are free. They are cheaper to run because the apps that run on them tend to be less expensive, or free … they use less electricity … and they can often be run without additional security software because they aren’t prone to infection.

Those other operating systems tend to be easier to operate because they are built with the legacy of Windows/OSX as a model, without having to support the legacy of Windows/OSX. PCs, in particular, put in a lot of effort to be backwards compatible with (in some cases) decades-old systems.

A quick note for PC gamers: save yourself some money and switch to a video game console … they are a fraction of the price.

If you are hooked on one or more particular Windows or OS X programs that aren’t available on other platforms, then you have no choice. But in most cases, there are alternatives. So, if it’s time to replace that aging Mac or PC, give some serious consideration to Chrome/Android/iOS/Linux/console devices.

Best Practices – Internet Security

There are some good practices around Internet security that everyone should know and follow. I’ve said them all, many times before … but it doesn’t hurt to repeat them now and then … so here they are.

Use strong passwords

Use strong (either long or complex) passwords for all your important online accounts. If you use a “local” account to log into Windows, consider switching to a “Microsoft” account for extra security there.

Be confident of your firewall

Between the firewall in your wireless modem or router, and the one in your operating system, you are well protected; in my opinion, there is no need to buy a third-party firewall (like the one included in an “Internet Security Suite”). If you are concerned about your firewall, there are a couple of things you can do. First, reset it; there are posted methods for doing that for most operating systems. Second, test it; I trust the ShieldsUP! page by Gibson’s Research (grc.com/shieldsup) to tell me if my firewall is vulnerable.

If you are running Windows, you should run at least one antimalware program

The built-in “Windows Defender” in Windows 10, or “Microsoft Security Essentials” in Windows 7/8, give you good basic protection. There are other good free and paid programs around as well; just make sure they are always current and running. You should consider running “second opinion” programs (like the free Malwarebytes) every month as well. These measures are valid, but not as pertinent, with other operating systems like OS X, iOS, Android, or Linux.

Use encryption whenever possible

Encrypted websites appear with a lock symbol in your browser. Make sure that symbol is there whenever you are on a site that you would like to communicate with privately, especially for ecommerce. If privacy of your email is a concern, look at using encrypted connections there as well.

Do your updates

Operating-system updates fix known bugs and security flaws, so do them!

Back up

Even if you are being very careful where you click, you may click on the wrong thing one day, and poof … there goes your data. To avoid this, you should have a backup procedure for your data that is either automated, or very easy … and detached from your computer so it doesn’t suffer the same fate as your main data (particularly fire, theft, or corruption). Teky uses the free Windows program SyncBack. You should also consider encrypting your data and/or your backup if they are vulnerable to theft. Teky suggests using BitLocker (built into Windows Pro/Enterprise) or VeraCrypt.